How to Be a Good Wife 1920’s Style

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 From here, check it out, awesome stuff, old school style

How to be a good hubby here

How to Be a Good Wife.

1. Reverence Your Husband.—He sustains by God’s order a position of dignity as head of a family, head of the woman. Any breaking down of this order indicates a mistake in the union, or a digression from duty.

2. Love Him.—A wife loves as naturally as the sun shines. Love is your best weapon. You conquered him with that in the first place. You can reconquer by the same means.

3. Do Not Conceal Your Love from Him.—If he is crowded with care, and too busy to seem to heed your love, you need to give all the greater attention to securing his knowledge of your love. If you intermit he will settle down into a hard, cold life with increased rapidity. Your example will keep the light on his conviction. The more he neglects the fire on the hearth, the more carefully must you feed and guard it. It must not be allowed to go out. Once out you must sit ever in darkness and in the cold.

4. Cultivate the Modesty and Delicacy of Your Youth.—The relations and familiarity of wedded life may seem to tone down the sensitive and retiring instincts of girlhood, but nothing can compensate for the loss of these. However, much men may admire the public performance of gifted women, they do not desire that boldness and dash in a wife. The holy blush of a maiden’s modesty is more powerful in hallowing and governing a home than the heaviest armament that ever a warrior bore.

5. Cultivate Personal Attractiveness.—This means the storing of your mind with a knowledge of passing events, and with a good idea of the world’s general advance. If you read nothing, and make no effort to make yourself attractive, you will soon sink down into a dull hack of stupidity. If your husband never hears from you any words of wisdom, or of common information, he will soon hear nothing from you. Dress and gossips soon wear out. If your memory is weak, so that it hardly seems worth while to read, that is additional reason for reading.

6. Cultivate Physical Attractiveness.—When you were encouraging the attentions of him whom you now call husband, you did not neglect any item of dress or appearance that could help you. Your hair was always in perfect training. You never greeted him with a ragged or untidy dress or soiled hands. It is true that your “market is made,” but you cannot afford to have it “broken.” Cleanliness and good taste will attract now as they did formerly. Keep yourself at your best. Make the most of physical endowments. Neatness and order break the power of poverty.

7. Study Your Husband’s Character.—He has his peculiarities. He has no right to many of them, and you need to know them; thus you can avoid many hours of friction. The good pilot steers around the sunken rocks that lie in the channel. The engineer may remove them, not the pilot. You are more pilot than engineer. Consult his tastes. It is more important to your home, that you should please him than anybody else.

8. Practice Economy.—Many families are cast out of peace into grumbling and discord by being compelled to fight against poverty. When there are no great distresses to be endured or accounted for, complaint and fault-finding are not so often evoked. Keep your husband free from the annoyance of disappointed creditors, and he will be more apt to keep free from annoying you. To toil hard for bread, to fight the wolf from the door, to resist impatient creditors, to struggle against complaining pride at home, is too much to ask of one man. A crust that is your own is a feast, while a feast that is purloined from unwilling creditors if a famine.

Also check out these chapters

  • Dress, page 88
  • Beauty, page 91
  • Sensible Helps to Beauty, page 95
  • How to Keep the Bloom and Grace of Youth, page 97
  • Form and Deformity, page 98
  • How to Determine a Perfect Human Figure, page 99
  • The History, Mystery, Benefits and Injuries of the Corset, page 101
  • Tight-Lacing, page 104
  • The Care of the Hair, page 107
  • How to Cure Pimples or Other Facial Eruptions, page 111
  • Black-Heads and Flesh Worms, page 112
  • Love, page 114
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About Kristina

50 year old Christian lady, knitter, pet sitter/walker, bible collector, crafter, little business owner, thrill seeker (only when shopping at thrift stores for tremendous bargains) my animals servant, a child of God, saved, redeemed and trying to be joyful in a fallen world.

4 responses »

  1. Sounds good to me.

    Oh, wait, did I say that out loud?

    He has his peculiarities. He has no right to many of them, and you need to know them; thus you can avoid many hours of friction.

    So if he’s an angry, drunken, verbally abusive idiot, it’s your job to make sure you don’t get hit.

    Does this mean you’re not the Home Engineer but the Home Pilot?

  2. I’m a good pilot in some areas, but I’ve trained him so well…..
    hey, I just post them, this was the 1920’s…..
    I was cracking up about the other chapters, personal hygiene and such, but didn’t want to post them here.
    I figure if people wanted to see the ‘good/funny stuff’ they could click on the link.

  3. I’m dreadfully curious about some of the other topics–even the chapter titles sound hilarious. But, I can’t get any of the links to go through.
    It does make me cringe, though, since it wasn’t a joke, but real advice that came out of a worldview which feels demeaning and confining, even (or maybe especially) from this far away.
    ~~I sent you the link, yeah, its pretty funny, but thats the way life was back then. Thanks for stopping by!

  4. I think that #7 is especially missed out by women. One way to tell if you do a good job at it is to look at his expression when he opens your presents at Christmas and his birthday. If he has a confused look on his face, then you might not be doing a good job at “knowing” him.

    If I don’t get tears of joy or total surprised looks from my wife when she receives gifts from me, then I know I need to take another look at who she is.

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