Oh, This Oughta Be Good!

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Im working on a part 2 to the Musings on Giving post,  my aunt is recovering from her surgery, still waiting to hear if we, as a family, have the breast cancer gene, I might get tested. God has given us a beautiful day, laying in the sun is on my schedule as is working out and cleaning toilets. Ahh, the sweet life…..enjoy!

 

 

 

Here’s how to handle a crush on your pastor.

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And Check this out! This is crazy…….or is it?

Jerusalem Syndrome…….

 Types

The ‘classic’ Jerusalem syndrome, where a visit to Jerusalem seems to trigger an intense religious psychosis that resolves quickly or on departure, has been a subject of debate in the medical literature[2][3][4]. Most of the discussion has centred on whether this definition of the Jerusalem syndrome is a distinct form of psychosis, or simply a re-expression of a previously existing psychotic illness that was not picked up by the medical authorities in Israel.

In response to this, Bar-El et al. classified the syndrome[1] into three major types to reflect the different types of interactions between a visit to Jerusalem and unusual or psychosis-related thought processes. However Kalian and Witztum have objected that Bar-El et al. presented no evidence to justify the detailed typology and prognosis presented, and that the types in fact seem to be unrelated rather than different aspects of a syndrome.

 Type I

Jerusalem syndrome imposed on a previous psychotic illness. This refers to individuals already diagnosed as having a psychotic illness before their visit to Jerusalem. They have typically gone to the city because of the influence of delusional religious ideas, often with a goal or mission in mind which they believe needs to be completed on arrival or during their stay. For example, an affected person may believe himself to be an important historical religious figure, or may be influenced by important religious ideas or concepts (such as causing the coming of the Messiah or the second coming of Christ).

Type II

Jerusalem syndrome superimposed on and complicated by idiosyncratic ideas. This does not necessarily take the form of mental illness, and may simply be a culturally anomalous obsession with the significance of Jerusalem, either as an individual, or as part of a small religious group with idiosyncratic spiritual beliefs.

 Type III

Jerusalem syndrome as a discrete form, uncompounded by previous mental illness. This describes the best known type, whereby a previously mentally balanced person becomes psychotic after arriving in Jerusalem. The psychosis is characterised by an intense religious character and typically resolves to full recovery after a few weeks, or after being removed from the locality. It shares some features with the diagnostic category of a ‘brief psychotic episode’, although a distinct pattern of behaviours has been noted:

  1. Anxiety, agitation, nervousness and tension, plus other unspecified reactions.
  2. Declaration of the desire to split away from the group or the family and to tour Jerusalem alone. Tourist guides aware of the Jerusalem syndrome and of the significance of such declarations may at this point refer the tourist to an institution for psychiatric evaluation in an attempt to preempt the subsequent stages of the syndrome. If unattended, these stages are usually unavoidable.
  3. A need to be clean and pure: obsession with taking baths and showers; compulsive fingernail and toenail cutting.
  4. Preparation, often with the aid of hotel bed-linen, of a long, ankle-length, toga-like gown, which is always white.
  5. The need to scream, shout, or sing out loud psalms, verses from the Bible, religious hymns or spirituals. Manifestations of this type serve as a warning to hotel personnel and tourist guides, who should then attempt to have the tourist taken for professional treatment. Failing this, the two last stages will develop.
  6. A procession or march to one of Jerusalem’s holy places.
  7. Delivery of a ‘sermon’ in a holy place. The sermon is usually very confused and based on an unrealistic plea to humankind to adopt a more wholesome, moral, simple way of life.

Bar-El et al. reported 42 such cases over a period of 13 years, but in no case were they able to actually confirm that the condition was temporary.

And here, http://www.bibleinterp.com/articles/Goren_Jerusalem_Syndrome.htm

and here, http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/jersynd.html

and here, http://www.zionism-israel.com/dic/Jerusalem_Syndrome.htm

BLESSINGS, Kristina

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11 responses »

  1. WhoreChurch got an NC-17 rating.

    Am I healthy if my health is mantained by being a cyborg? My wife actually calls me Darth Vader.

  2. Nuttin’ wrong with ecclesiastical romances! Good place to start one, I’d say. Unless you’re… Catholic …or married or something, eh? Hehe.

  3. the reason for the title was orginally for the wikipedia entry, but then i added more stuff.
    how can Total Tranny be worth more than me, i eat more veggies!!!
    maybe, Kevin, if you have more metal parts than human parts, you are more salvage-able. hehehehehe
    oh, you know, i can not believe you said that, but then again, i can believe, deacon-lover…..

  4. Aren’t you the one married to the deacon? 😉

    BTW, I’m worth $4490. Of course, that does none of us any good once we’re dead…

  5. why is your body worth more than mine? because you are younger i guess. hmmmm.
    i didnt want to say the real thing cuz then people would know who you are 😉 cough*elder*cough

  6. Ah, Kristina, the epitome of discretion!

    I don’t know why mine’s more, but it’s not much more. Did you notice sometimes the price went up just because you were more… unusual/issueful? So that’s my theory. 😉

  7. i took the test again, i think its for people who had funky stuff happened to them, so they could see the effects, maybe? cuz, dang it, i dont think they want healthy people! fine, i will just use this sweet thing for parting out to others who could use my eyes or innards. hehe 😉
    oh jeez, i crack [only] myself up.

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